What is a CPU miner and everything about CPU miner.

What is a CPU miner and everything about CPU miner.

 

1. What is CPU miner?

CPU miner is a multi-threaded, highly optimized CPU miner for Litecoin, Bitcoin, and other cryptocurrencies. Currently supported algorithms are SHA-256d and scrypt(N, 1, 1).

It supports the getblocktemplate mining protocol as well as the Stratum mining protocol, and can be used for both solo and pooled mining.

2. Why do people use expensive GPUs for Bitcoin mining?

#1: GPU mining for bit coins has largely wound down as it no longer represents the best return on investment.

  • Due to the rising hashrate of the bitcoin network caused by the introduction of ASICs to the market, GPU mining Bitcoins has become impracticable. The hashrate of most GPU units is below 1GH/s, and as of 2014, some single ASIC units are able to reach speeds of over 1,000GH/s while consuming far less power than used by a GPU.

#2: GPUs are better suited to the task of bitcoin mining

  • A CPU core can execute 4 32-bit instructions per clock (using a 128-bit SSE instruction) or 8 via AVX (256-Bit), whereas a GPU like the Radeon HD 5970 can execute 3200 32-bit instructions per clock (using its 3200 ALUs or shaders). This is a difference of 800 (or 400 in case of AVX) times more instructions per clock. As of 2011, the fastest CPUs have up to 6, 8, or 12 cores and a somewhat higher frequency clock (2000-3000 MHz vs. 725 MHz for the Radeon HD 5970), but one HD5970 is still more than five times faster than four 12-core CPUs at 2.3GHz

#3: GPUs are cheap compared to things like Xeons. 12 core Xeon price tags get into the $2,000+ range. You could buy 3-4 very high end CPUs for the cost of a single XEON. GPU mining makes more economic sense than CPU mining because it's significantly more efficient. Of course, these days, it's all ASICs anyway. 

3. Why a GPU mines faster than a CPU?

Some Bitcoin users might wonder why there is a huge disparity between the mining output of a CPU versus a GPU.

First, just to clarify, the CPU, or central processing unit, is the part of the computer that performs the will of the software loaded on the computer. It's the main executive for the entire machine. It is the master that tells all the parts of the computer what to do - in accordance with the program code of the software, and, hopefully, the will of the user.

Most computers have multi-core CPUs nowadays (which is almost the same thing as having multiple CPU's in a single physical package)., and some computers even have multiple CPUs.

The CPU is usually a removable component that plugs into the computer's main circuit board, or motherboard and sits underneath a large, metallic heat sink which usually has a fan, a few are cooled by water.

The GPU, or graphics processing unit, is a part of the video rendering system of a computer. The typical function of a GPU is to assist with the rendering of 3D graphics and visual effects so that the CPU doesn't have to.

Servers usually have very limited or no GPU facilities as they are mostly managed over a text-based remote interface. Most mainstream computers have much slower but less power consuming and cheaper IGPs (Integrated Graphics Processor), which are GPUs as well but integrated directly into the chipset and soldered onto the motherboard, rather than separate, more powerful but power consuming AGP or PCIe cards with GPUs, but separate GPUs. Powerful GPUs are needed mostly for graphic intensive tasks such as gaming or video editing. For example, the translucent windows in Windows 7, or technologies like Mac OS X's Quartz, which powers the Aqua desktop and its beautiful, water-like graphical effects and animations such as bulging the Dock in a smooth animation when the mouse is moved to the lower edge of the screen or "sucking" windows into the Dock when they are minimized - these are powered by GPUs.

A GPU is like a CPU, but there are important internal differences that make them suited toward their special tasks. These are the differences that make Bitcoin mining far more favorable on a GPU.

4. Which OS is the best for mining?

When it comes to choosing your Ethereum ỏ Bitcoin mining operating software, there are three main contenders: Windows, Linux, and ethOS. Personally, we found that Window is the best and easiest OS for mining.

If you’re planning on using 6 GPUs, then Windows 10 is recommended as it has support built in naturally. Windows 7 & 8 will require some playing around with. If you are used to command line style systems, and mining will be the only aim of the rig, then I’d highly recommend looking at ethOS.

Additionally, Windows has the benefit of more universal support and generally speaking, better overclocking tools. Furthermore, accessing it is an absolute ease with something like TeamViewer. It does have the downside of slightly more complicated setup but nothing too difficult, especially if you don’t plan on tweaking the GPUs performance.

Furtheremore, if you’re only looking to mine Ethereum as a hobby with your normal PC, then MinerGate allows you to do this extremely easily.

 

We’d love to hear your views on this…